arijandro:

Iain Thomas, I Wrote This For You

#Art

silent-wordsmith:

mollymimieux:

Imagine that one day the whole world would look like this.

We don’t belong here; we never have

Anonymous: u should post a selfie with ur dad he sounds cool

verswayze:

well i mean this is a picture of him dancing with the shopping cart at ikea so 

he says “thank u i am very cool”

tropicalfruitbabe:

*doesn’t check bank account*
*pretends everything is fine*

ebrodevo:

INCREDIBLY ATTRACTIVE PEOPLE who are simultaneously GIANT DORKS are my ULTIMATE WEAKNESS

too-ashtonishing:

I feel like this picture is so important

heroinbae:

I support boys with nose rings

harmfully-korine:

The IMDb board for Dear White People is exactly what I expected

believeinrecovery:

A little table to how to get rid of all that negative self-talk. We have to learn look at the good in situations too, instead of dwelling on things we can’t change- because you know what? We may not be able to change what is happening but we CAN change how we view it! 

(Source)

#Art
If your first impulse is to set a book aside as being irrelevant, stop and consider where that impulse comes from. Are you making assumptions about who your children will be able to relate to or empathize with? As adults, our reading choices are often weighed down by preconceptions about whose stories matter to us. Marketing and bookstores reinforce these separations by shelving things like African American Literature separately, implying that some stories are only of interest to certain people. But young readers are often much more open-minded, and need only a great story to engage them. —"Debunking 3 Common Myths About Diverse Books" by Hannah Ehrlich (Reading Rainbow)  (via diversityinya)
#yes

sohapppily:

this is supposed to be ironic but bo actually looks really good and it stresses me out a little: a photoset

humansinthesky:

when you see a hot guy wearing sweatpants

image

#GOD